5 Best JavaScript Editors: Developers Rank the Best Tools Worldwide

JavaScript has continued to grow in importance over the last decade. In fact, according to StackOverflow’s Insights, JavaScript has been the most popular programming language for the past 7 years, edging out popular languages including Python, C# and Java. The State of Javascript survey, which includes responses from over 20,000 developers, reveals that five JavaScript editors stand out accounting 95% of all usage!

1. Visual Studio Code

VSCode is the dominant leader in online JavaScript editors. Featuring cross platform support on Linux, macOS and Windows, VSCode has built in code completion for your node.js modules and JavaScript code. As expected with Microsoft, Typescript is a first class citizen. Git is seamlessly integrated, meaning you can make commits, reviews diffs and more in real-time all without leaving the editor. Visual Studio Code is a lightweight code editor that was built from the ground up for speed. Autocompletion goes beyond function completion and also offers documentation and function argument information as you develop. Microsoft has done an excellent job with community engagement and VSCode has a vibrant developer community creating powerful extensions which save additional time. Sought after features such as live preview and chrome debugging with devtools are easily accessible through the Visual Studio Marketplace. In addition, if you really want to get under the covers, the entire text editor source code is hosted on github as open source software.

2. Sublime Text

A commercial editor with a large user base, developers find the $80 fee for Sublime Text well worthwhile due to its speed (in part derived from it being written in C++). As with VSCode, there is a great developer and plugin community that has filled in the gaps creating a powerful editor environment for JavaScript. Often referred to as a midpoint between bloated IDE and lean editors such as VIM, Sublime opens files fast and leans on plugins via package control to make it a great experience for JS development. Leveraging Babel for intelligent syntax highlighting /smart code completion and gitgutter for diffs and pushes, Sublimelinter for seamless ESlint and JShint tie-ins makes Sublime a fast, capable and lightweight JavaScript editor.

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Replicating the iPhone Swipe Gesture – Vertical swiping

For those who wanted a vertical swiping feature to the the swipe gesture gallery that I created earlier, this post has a new demo and minimal explanation about a vertical swipe gesture gallery. Now you can swipe the images up or down.
I will not go through the basics once again as I have explained them in details in my previous posts. You can refer them once again in these two tutorials – post 1, post 2. Check out the demo below. Open the link in a webkit browser in either your mobile device or your computer.

Demo link: http://rialab.jbk404.site50.net/swipegesture/vertical/

Below is a screenshot of the gallery in action. You can see that the images are being moved vertically.

Screenshot of vertical swiping through images
Screenshot of vertical swiping through images

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Replicating the iPhone Swipe Gesture – auto scrolling feature

This is an update to the Replicating touch swipe gesture javascript implementation series that I have been writing for some time now and this time I have tried out the auto scrolling feature. Sometimes users may want a auto scrolling along with the normal swipe gesture feature. This post will talk about it and the changes to code that were made to make it auto scroll. First let’s check out the demo, the demo runs in both computer webkit browsers and mobile webkit browsers.

Demo link: http://rialab.jbk404.site50.net/swipegesture/auto_scrolling/

Now, let’s talk on the implementation,
First the features of this demo-

  • Auto scrolling – the gallery slides change automatically at periodical times. Based on the requirement specify whether auto scroll stops on user interaction or continues.
  • Looping – the gallery loops and is circular.
  • Direction – supports two direction – left or right. Specify which direction the gallery should auto scroll.
  • Click/Tap to URL – click or tap to open URL’s.
  • Swipe gesture – and then the touch based swipe gesture for mobiles is available as well.

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Circular swipe gesture gallery – looping through images

This is another update to the regular swipe gesture gallery that I created in two of my earlier post – post1, post2. This time I have implemented the looping feature for the images. The gallery never ends, instead you swipe it in a circular motion. So, whenever you reach the end of the list, swipe again from right to left across your device’s screen to see the first image and also when you reach the beginning of the list you swipe from left to right of your device’s screen to see the last image again. Try out the demo first and you will get a feel of it. Check out the demo in a webkit desktop browser (Chrome, Safari) or an iOS/Android device’s browser. Click on any image to open a URL as well. So, click/tap to open URL is included.

Demo link: http://rialab.jbk404.site50.net/swipegesture/circular/

An instance of the demo application – with reduced opacity and exposed images, the darker one being the one currently displayed and is inside the wrapper div.

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360 degree car rotation – common code for mobiles and computer browsers

I had been updating my examples and tutorials off  lately and trying to create a more general approach to application development – Write a single app that runs in mobile browsers as well as computer browsers. Following the same approach, this time I am updating one of my previous tutorials – 360 Degree Car/Product rotation for iPhones. So, I worked on a 36o degree car rotation code that runs in both mobile and desktop browsers.

This tutorial is an update to my previous one, I also present a new demo. I will not go into the details, which I have talked about in my previous tutorial. Have a look at the demo, open it in either an iOS browser or a computer web-kit browser.

Link: http://jbk404.site50.net/360DegreeView/mobile/common.html

360 degree car rotation in mobile safari

What are the changes?

All the changes are in the javascript code. I have introduced a device detection mechanism and then automatically assign either touch events (for mobiles) or mouse events (for computer browsers). These are the same changes that I have recently talked of in my last post – Replicating the iPhone Swipe Gesture — common code for mobiles and computer browsers. That should help you out.

Other than that just try the example link in a computer web-kit browser – Chrome/Safari or an iOS device browser which is also a web-kit browser. Android devices need some changes and the same code might not work. I have talked on this in my previous post.

For the code, right click to view the source.

Replicating the iPhone Swipe Gesture – common code for mobiles and computer browsers.

This is another update for the iPhone Swipe Gesture that I have created. This is the third update to the series – Part 1 and Part 2. In case you have missed out of the earlier tutorials and detailed explanation then you can have a look at them first, before proceeding with this tutorial. What I have been able to achieve is that, I have replicated the native iPhone swipe gesture for the iPhone web-kit browser. So, throughout the series I have been able to create a HTML/JavaScript/CSS3 version of the swipe gesture. If in case, again you are not sure of the swipe gesture and swiping, I would recommend to go through my previous tutorials – Part1 and Part2.

Now, the update and the agenda of this tutorial is that – I have developed a common universal code for mobile browsers and computer browsers. Note that when I am saying browsers I mean web-kit browsers – Chrome & Safari in computers, and then the default web browsers in iOS and Android mobiles. The major changes are in the javascript code, where I have automated the user event handling process. What this means is that for mobile devices touch based events are registered and listened to and then for computer browsers mouse based events are registered and handled by the script automatically. This way there is no need to hard code touch events for mobiles and mouse events for computers. The same code works everywhere.

But, still to support different device screen sizes you will need to make changes to the CSS or the asset (images) sizes. The demo that I have worked on, I have considered the iPhone resolution – 320 x 416.

Check out the demo (same link works in mobiles and computers): http://jsphkhan.github.io/swipe_gesture_common/

An image/slide showing up in portrait mode
Common implementation for mobiles and computers

Continue reading “Replicating the iPhone Swipe Gesture – common code for mobiles and computer browsers.”

JavaScript Touch event or Mouse event – detect and handle according to device

You might have faced this issue before or even might have wondered – How to write a single piece of code that establishes correct event in the device i.e touch events for mobile web browsers and mouse events for desktop browsers. You need not hard code the events for your app code. Once you detect and handle those events, you can run your app everywhere – mobiles and computer browsers. Normally when we develop an app for mobile browsers we test it in a desktop browser, so if you have touch events hard-coded into your script then it is a pain to change the script and make it work for computer browsers(replacing touch events with mouse events) and then change it back again to touch for mobiles. So, here is a small script/trick to universally handle the event and need not worry about devices,

var isTouchSupported = 'ontouchstart' in window;
var startEvent = isTouchSupported ? 'touchstart' : 'mousedown';
var moveEvent = isTouchSupported ? 'touchmove' : 'mousemove';
var endEvent = isTouchSupported ? 'touchend' : 'mouseup';

If you see the first line of the script, it detects if ontouchstart property is available in the global window object. It it is available or it is a part of the window object, then it returns true else it returns false. Note that ontouchstart is a standard javascript touch event attribute. Now, if you are making this check in a computer browser (for e.g FF, Chrome or IE) then ontouchstart is not a property of the window object. So isTouchSupported will be set to false. Had it been a mobile browser (e.g iOS, Android) then ontouchstart would have been automatically a part of the window object and correspondingly isTouchSupported variable will set to true. This is all we need to detect. The next three lines establish a common platform for the touch vs mouse events i.e I am mapping the touch events to its corresponding mouse events.

Now, all you need is to register the event listener to your element so that some action is performed when the event is triggered on the element. Here is an example, (where myButton is the ID of my imaginary button)

document.getElementById("myButton").addEventListener(startEvent,function(){},false);

The startEvent variable acts as a placeholder. It will be replaced by mousedown for computer browsers and touchstart for mobile browsers. Similarly the other two events can be used. This way a single app can run everywhere.

Here is a good example with the usage (make sure you look at the javascript script code) – https://jbkflex.wordpress.com/2012/07/21/replicating-the-iphone-swipe-gesture-common-code-for-mobiles-and-desktop-browsers/

Here is another one – https://jbkflex.wordpress.com/2012/07/25/360-degree-car-rotation-common-code-for-mobiles-and-computer-browsers/

Please do suggest me if there are any better methods of mapping touch v/s mouse events.