How to install Phonegap Facebook plugin for iOS

This post has come out of my recent struggle to integrate the Facebook Connect plugin by Dave Johnson and make it work with my Phonegap iOS app. I had a hard time figuring things out as I was new to Phonegap iOS development. I was already doing Android apps with Phonegap, but iOS has given me some tough time. Nevertheless, around 2 days of gloomy and sad face was finally rewarded with a big smile. So, better I document it somewhere so that I do not struggle again and that’s where the inspiration for this post lies. And I must say, the official documentation is pathetic for newbies.
Alright, let’s get started. I will go step by step into the process with all details and screenshots so that it is very easy for you. In this post however, I will not be talking on how to create a Phonegap iOS app, or how to create Phonegap iOS plugins. For that you still need to look at the official documentation. I will only discuss on how we can install the Facebook plugin with a Phonegap iOS app and get started using it.
Before moving further I would like to inform you that I am using Phonegap 2.2.0 for my demo. There are new versions available – 2.5.0 being the latest at the time of writing. So you might want to check the official pages if you are using the latest version of Phonegap. But the steps mentioned below should work with the new versions of Phonegap as well. OK, time to start now.

Note: Phonegap and Cordova are the same (well, at least for me..). I prefer calling Phonegap.

1) Do I need a Mac? Simple answer – Yes, you need a Mac. I have heard and read thousand times about  people asking if iOS apps can be developed in a Windows machine. Simply, I just did not research, instead I have a Mac and I started on it. But the answer is you need a Mac definitely, since you will use XCode and the iOS SDK for development.

2) Create a Phonegap iOS App – I am using Phonegap 2.2.0. I am not going to show how to create a Phonegap iOS app. For that look at this pdf documentation here. If you cannot open it, check out this link which is the pdf source. This should get you started. However I have some screenshots below which should also help you out.
a) I have created a basic Phonegap app – FacebookPluginTest inside Cordova22FacebookTest folder under Documents. See the screenshot below. I have used the Terminal to create the app. You can find details about the command in the document above. So make sure you go through it once.
Create a basic Phonegap app with Terminal Read More »

Authoring “Adobe Edge Inspect Starter”…

My book “Instant Adobe Edge Inspect Starter” on mobile web debugging and testing has been published and it is now available online. For more details and to purchase you can visit here.

My book on mobile web debugging and testing.

Mobile web testing is currently a really time consuming and cumbersome process as there are no direct debugging tools available with mobile web browsers. Since mobile devices vary so much it is important to ensure that your web page looks as intended across the multiple mobile devices that you are targeting for your audience. Edge Inspect is a perfect tool for web developers and designers who are developing for mobile devices, allowing them to simultaneously test on numerous devices in real time as they develop without learning anything new.

“Instant Adobe Edge Inspect Starter” is a practical, hands-on guide that provides you with a number of detailed steps, which will help you to get started on testing and previewing all your mobile web projects on multiple mobile devices. This book will also show you how to use all the other available features of Edge Inspect and make the entire testing process on mobile devices very simple, effortless, and faster.

This book starts with an introduction to Edge Inspect and will take you through a number of clear and detailed steps needed to set up a working installation, and get up and running with testing your web pages on mobile devices.

You will also learn why traditional ways of testing mobile web applications are not very helpful and how Adobe Edge Inspect overcomes it. You will have a look at connecting single and multiple mobile devices with your computer and how to browse in sync.You will learn about remotely inspecting and previewing mobile web pages on a targeted device and directly see the changes taking place on the device itself. The book discusses in detail about creating your very own simple mobile web application, running it from a local server and testing it across mobile devices. You will also take a look at how to use the Edge Inspect web inspector window and do some basic HTML, CSS, and JavaScript debugging. And then finally you will have a look at using your own local Weinre debug server with Edge Inspect and some other very important features. If you want to take advantage of Adobe Edge Inspect and make mobile web testing a lot easier, then this is the book is for you.

“Instant Adobe Edge Inspect Starter” will guide you in getting started with Edge Inspect and will make testing on mobile devices a lot simpler and faster. The book is packed with a lot of examples and diagrams that will help you to test all your mobile web projects without any hassle.

Who this book is for?
This book is for frontend web developers and designers who are developing and testing web applications targeted for mobile browsers. It’s assumed that you have a basic understanding of creating web applications using HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, as well as being familiar with running web pages from local HTTP servers. Readers are also expected to have a basic knowledge of debugging web applications using developer tools such as the Chrome web inspector. And of course you need some mobile devices for running the example in this book and testing it.

Reviews

Ben Forta (Adobe Systems Inc‘s Director of Developer Relations): http://forta.com/blog/index.cfm/2013/4/12/Instant-Adobe-Edge-Inspect-Starter

Creative and Codehttp://creativeandcode.com/review-adobe-edge-inspect-starter-ebook/


Handy eBook to have available – by Chris.M
Overall, the book does a great job of getting you up and running with Edge Inspect. The first couple of chapters focus on getting the application installed on your computer, and then getting it set up on your mobile devices. Though the installation is fairly straightforward, the instructions they provide are detailed with plenty of screenshots, so you should have no issues getting set up.
They also give an overview of the best features of Edge Inspect. I’ve been using Edge Inspect for a while now and even I learned a few new things. The application really does make mobile testing incredibly easy with remote inspection and console log.
The eBook wraps up with some great resources for using Edge Inspect. If you are thinking of working on Responsive Web Design, Adobe Edge Inspect is an invaluable tool. I think the eBook is super handy to have as a reference, and for 5 bucks, why not?

worth having it as a reference – by Siddarth Kalyankar
“Instant Adobe Edge Inspect Starter” indeed is a starter for developers who wish to explore the possibilites of using Adobe Edge Inspector tool during their day to day development activity. It talks about Step-by-step, hands-on recipes to debug, test, and preview web applications on multiple mobile devices with Adobe Edge Inspect (Previously known as “Adobe Shadow” ).
This book assumes that the person who reads this is already into mobile web development and address some of his/her problems which are faced during the development cycle. This book is not intended to help you start doing mobile web development, but if you are web developer and willing to do mobile web development, this could come in handy for you as well.
The books briefs you about what is Adobe Edge Inspect, What are the reasons to use it and What you can do with with it. The main focus is on installation of the required components on your computer, the Edge inspect client on mobile device , how to pair mobile device with your computer and how to debug and preview. I found this information quiet useful as the entire installation process has been very well illustrated with screen shots focusing on Mac/ Windows operating systems, and Android/IOS for mobile device. The author has also provided with the code which can be used by first time developers to get started on their mobile web development venture.
If you are looking at speeding up your mobile web development, Adobe Edge Inspect is the tool and this book is worth having it as a reference.

More reviews from – Amazon

Previewing JSBin output in mobile devices using Adobe Edge Inspect

When Adobe renamed Shadow to Edge Inspect, one of the major changes that happened was the integration of JSBin into Edge Inspect. What this means is that whatever proof of concepts (also called Bins as per JSBin terminology) you have created with JSBin, you can remotely preview it directly in your mobile devices without any additional set up required.

If you haven’t tried JSBin yet, then let me introduce it to you. JSBin is a free online tool with which you can create HTML based small POC’s, test examples or I should say small mockup kind of applications. You can edit the HTML, CSS, Javascript and see the changes real time in your browser itself. JSBin is kind of a development environment wherein it has the HTML, CSS and JS editors where you write code for your example app. It also has the console panel for viewing javascript console logs and the the Output panel for previewing the result of your code. All these panels are integrated into one place and as you make changes to your code you can see the result in real time. Very handy. I found it useful for my mobile web apps. But then it is a tool which is on the small scale development side. So it doesn’t have all the fancy features of a typical IDE. Once you create your POC’s or Bins you can even share them. So in case JSBin sounds interesting to you, go ahead and start using it. Create your account at http://jsbin.com/ and start making some apps. The interface looks like the image shown below, (all the help can be found online at jsbin.com)
Click to see larger image
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Adobe Shadow is now Adobe Edge Inspect

In a major move on the 24th of September, Adobe has renamed Shadow to Adobe Edge Inspect and now it has become a part of the Adobe Edge Tools and Services : http://html.adobe.com/edge/
Shadow had been a great success for mobile web developers and designers to remotely debug applications on the mobile device in real time. I had been using the preview version of Shadow for quite a time and has found it really useful, the last one being the Shadow Labs Release 4. So now the preview period of Shadow is ending on the 31st of October and after that Shadow will be invalid. Instead you have to download Edge Inspect and start using it.
You can get Edge Inspect by signing up for a free Creative Cloud membership subscription or a paid subscription. Get a account for yourself at: https://creative.adobe.com/join/starter. The free version allows only one device to be paired with your computer while the paid full version allows multiple devices to be paired simultaneously with your computer. Here’s a video demonstration on the new Edge Inspect release

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Use your own Weinre server with Adobe Shadow – Step by step

Now that Adobe has released version 4 of Shadow they have included a very nice feature of adding or using your own Weinre debug server with Shadow. What it does is that it fastens up the connection time and reduces the wait time when you are using the default Weinre debug server that Adobe has hosted on their servers. So if you have a local instance of the Weinre server running in your computer, you can use that as a debug server for Adobe Shadow instead of using the remote debug server hosted by Adobe at http://debug.shadow.adobe.com:8080/. So let’s see how to do it.

First of all you will need to have the Weinre server set up in your computer. For that you will need the weinre jar file and Java installed in your computer. I have a full detailed tutorial on setting up and using Weinre in one of my earlier post. So please have a look at it and set up the server. You can check out the “Configuring and running the Weinre debug server” section in the postAssuming that you have the server set it up on your computer, then you need to start it. You can check my previous post for that too. Its all there.

Then you can verify if the server has started. Open your browser and navigate to http://<yourip&gt;:port where <yourip> is your machine’s ip address and port is the port number where the Weinre debug server listens to. You can find out the port and the details from the command prompt after you have run the server. The screenshot below shows my instance,


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Adobe Shadow – another way of remote debugging mobile web apps in iOS and Android

Logo used from Adobe Labs site

Adobe has come out with the preview version of their new tool Adobe Shadow that allows front-end web developers and designers to work faster and more efficiently by streamlining the preview process, making it easier to customize websites for mobile devices. With shadow you can remotely preview your mobile web projects and also debug them. In fact Shadow uses the WEINRE debug/web inspector client to allow developers to remotely inspect HTML , view console logs and also make changes to the DOM. In the last post I have talked about WEINRE in details. You can refer it if you are new to WEINRE.

Shadow allows multiple devices (mobile devices) to connect wirelessly to your computer and as you browse in your computer all the target mobile devices will be in sync. So when you make changes to the HTML DOM in the computer you can see the changes instantly on all the target devices.

You need three things to configure Shadow and get started,

1) Shadow helper application. Install this in your computer. Shadow is not available for Windows XP so you need a Windows 7 machine or a Mac (OS X 10.6 and 10.7) machine. This helper application must keep running at the time of a debug session that you will carry.

2) Google Chrome browser extension for shadow. You need to install the extension. You will get the link to this in the downloads page below.

3) Shadow client app for iOS or Android. Whichever mobile device you have, go to the app market and search for Adobe Shadow, find it and then install it. For example go to Apple App Store and get the Shadow app and install it.

You can find all the downloads in the Adobe Labs site : http://labs.adobe.com/downloads/shadow.html

You can also find a very nice video demonstration to get started : http://tv.adobe.com/watch/adobe-technology-sneaks-2012/adobe-shadow.

Personally, after trying both Adobe Shadow and Weinre, I found Shadow easier to configure and get started with debugging mobile web applications remotely. For Weinre you have to install Java separately, use command line instructions and also inject javascript into the client code. This at times is a hassle and confusing for first timers.

This post was just a kind of teaser for you and in case you have not heard about Adobe Shadow you can give it a try. I also look forward to come out with a detailed tutorial on how to use Shadow with screenshots of my instance. Till then I am continuing to explore Shadow and similar tools.

Below are some of my previous tutorials that should help you.

  1. Debugging mobile web applications remotely with Weinrehttps://jbkflex.wordpress.com/2012/04/12/debug-mobile-web-applications-remotely-with-weinre/
  2. Use your own Weinre server with Adobe Shadow – Step by stephttps://jbkflex.wordpress.com/2012/08/28/use-your-own-weinre-server-with-adobe-shadow-step-by-step/
  3. WEINRE – Web Inspector Remote Video by Patrick Muellerhttps://jbkflex.wordpress.com/2012/09/18/weinre-web-inspector-remote-video-by-patrick-mueller/

Update
1) Now that Adobe has released version 4 of Shadow they have included a very nice feature of adding or using your own Weinre debug server with Shadow. What it does is that it fastens up the connection time, performance and keeps the remote traffic local. So if you have a local instance of the Weinre server running in your computer, you can use that as a debug server for Adobe Shadow instead of using the remote debug server hosted by Adobe at http://debug.shadow.adobe.com:8080/. Read how to do it here.

2) Adobe Shadow is now Adobe Edge Inspect: Read the post and find out what changes has been made : https://jbkflex.wordpress.com/2012/09/27/adobe-shadow-is-now-adobe-edge-inspect/